Improving Computer Scalability & Reliability to Enable Continued Technology Advancement

MISSION:
TO ENABLE THE CONTINUED INNOVATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE INTEGRATED CIRCUIT.

A UNIQUE APPROACH

In essence, we have focused our solution on how IP-Cores and other components communicate. Traditionally, IC components communicate synchronously via a global clock that controls each and every individual component and forces them to talk to each other in lock-step. So, we asked the question, how can we find a better way to support more robust communication requirements while not asking design teams to throw out existing IP or having to learn new approaches to designing IP?

OUR ANSWER: a globally asynchronous design methodology where we break the IC design into small independently operating IP-Cores and then re-connect each of the cores to each other, allowing each to communicate on its own timescale.

THE “AHA” MOMENT

It was 2004, and three of our founders were attending an international symposium they organized on Clockless Computing (Coordinating Billions of Transistors), at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. In the program, leaders in asynchronous computing reviewed future design challenges imposed on IC densities according to Moore’s Law.

We saw that work on asynchronous computing done decades earlier toward the goal of arbitrarily-large, discrete-component computer systems would be relevant again, this time at the microscopic scale. These older clockless techniques could be blended with modern clocked methods to solve the anticipated complexity and reliability challenges and thereby achieve continued Moore’s Law scalability. Bingo! we said to ourselves.

THE FORMATION OF BLENDICS

So, after much discussion and excitement, we determined that we could make a real difference. We brought together an astonishing group of mega-talented people who have each had a significant hand in some of the world’s most impactful technological innovations over the last 50 years, and in 2007, launched Blendics.

Our name “Blendics” can be deconstructed as: Blended Integrated Circuit Systems.

CONTACT

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